History of temple

 

BANTEARY SAMRE TEMPLE

Banteay Samré (Khmer: ប្រាសាទបន្ទាយសំរែ) is a temple at AngkorCambodia located east of theEast Baray. Built under Suryavarman II andYasovarman II in the early 12th century, it is aHindu temple in the Angkor Wat style.

 

Named after the Samré, an ancient people of Indochina, the temple uses the same materials as the Banteay Srei.

Banteay Srei is known for the intricacy of its carvings. This carving is of a kala, a mythical creature representative of time and of the god Siva.

Banteay Srei (or Banteay Srey) (Khmer: ប្រាសាទបន្ទាយស្រី) is a 10th century Cambodian temple dedicated to the Hindu god Shiva. Located in the area of Angkor in Cambodia, at 13.5989 N,103.9628 E, it lies near the hill of Phnom Dei, 25 km (15 miles) north-east of the main group of temples that once belonged to the medieval capitals of Yasodharapura and Angkor Thom.[1]Banteay Srei is built largely of red sandstone, a medium that lends itself to the elaborate decorative wall carvings which are still observable today. The buildings themselves are miniature in scale, unusually so when measured by the standards of Angkorian construction. These factors have made the temple extremely popular with tourists, and have led to its being widely praised as a "precious gem", or the "jewel of Khmer art."[2]


History

"Banteay Srei" (Citadel of Women) is the modern name of a 10th century Khmer temple originally called "Tribhuvanamahesvara" (Great Lord of the Threefold World)[citation needed], an appellation of the god Siva.

Consecrated in 967 A.D.[citation needed], Banteay Srei was the only major temple at Angkor not built by a monarch; its construction is credited to a courtier named Yajnavaraha (Khmer: យជ្ញវរាហៈ), who served as a counsellor to king Rajendravarman(Khmer: ព្រះបាទរាជេន្រ្ទវរ្ម័ន). The foundationalstela says that Yajnavaraha was a scholar and philanthropist who helped those who suffered from illness, injustice, or poverty.[3] Originally, the temple was surrounded by a town called Isvarapura.